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Readability Assessment of Commonly Used German Urological Questionnaires

Pavel Lyatoshinsky, Manolis Pratsinis, Dominik Abt, Hans-Peter Schmid, Valentin Zumstein & Patrick Betschart

abstract

Purpose
We intended to assess the readability of the German versions of commonly used urological questionnaires and identify questions that are potentially demanding for patients.

Materials and Methods
The Guidelines of the European Association of Urology were analyzed for recommended questionnaires. Readability of the German versions of these questionnaires including their respective single-items was analyzed using established readability assessment tools.

Results
A total of 13 questionnaires were analyzed. The calculated readability scores ranged between the 4.3th and 10.3th grade level. Easiest readability as calculated by median grade levels was found for the short and long forms of the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaires-Female and -Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and the SF-Qualiveen (all median grade level 5.0). The short form of the International Index of Erectile Function showed the hardest readability (median grade level 10.0). Readability of the single-items varied widely between the assessed questionnaires with up to 80% (the International Index of Erectile Function) of their single-items being written above recommended grade levels.

Conclusions
The majority of commonly used German urological questionnaires comply with recommended readability levels. Some questionnaires as well as single-items of most of the questionnaires clearly exceed recommended readability levels. This should be considered for interpretation of their results and when revising questionnaires.
   
citation Lyatoshinsky P, Pratsinis M, Abt D, Schmid H P, Zumstein V, Betschart P. Readability Assessment of Commonly Used German Urological Questionnaires. Curr Urol 2019; 13:87-93.
   
type journal paper/review (English)
date of publishing 01-10-2019
journal title Curr Urol (13/2)
ISSN print 1661-7649
pages 87-93
PubMed 31768175
DOI 10.1159/000499287