Kantonsspital St.Gallen
login

Swiss analysis of multiple sclerosis: a multicenter, non-interventional, retrospective cohort study of disease-modifying therapies

Claudio Gobbi, Chiara Zecca, Michael Linnebank, Stefanie Müller, Xiaojun You, Rosetta Meier, Emmanuela Borter & Martin Traber

abstract

BACKGROUND
There is a scarcity of reports comparing efficacy and tolerability of the multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies [DMTs; intramuscular interferon-β1a (IM IFNβ-1a), subcutaneous (SC) IFNβ-1a, SC IFNβ-1b, SC glatiramer acetate (GA)] in a real-world setting.

METHODS
This multicenter, non-interventional, retrospective cohort study analyzed data from 546 patients with clinically isolated or relapsing-remitting MS constantly treated with one DMT for 2 years. Annualized relapse rate (ARR), Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores, and DMT tolerability were assessed.

RESULTS
Demographic data were comparable across DMTs. There were no significant differences between DMT groups in ARR during study year 1 (p = 0.277) or study year 2 (p = 0.670), or in EDSS change between years 1 and 2 (p = 0.624). Adverse events were frequent (39-56%) in all groups. Flu-like symptoms were less frequent with GA treatment (2.3% vs. IM IFNβ-1a, 46.7%; SC IFNβ-1a, 39.8%; SC IFNβ-1b, 25.8%; p < 0.05). Injection site reactions were less often reported with IM IFNβ-1a (10.5% vs. SC IFNβ-1a, 33.9%; SC IFNβ-1b, 38.3%; GA, 26.1%; p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS
All DMTs showed comparable effects on MS relapse rate and EDSS change, with IM IFNβ-1a and GA being more tolerable with respect to injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms, respectively.
   
citation Gobbi C, Zecca C, Linnebank M, Müller S, You X, Meier R, Borter E, Traber M. Swiss analysis of multiple sclerosis: a multicenter, non-interventional, retrospective cohort study of disease-modifying therapies. Eur Neurol 2013; 70:35-41.
   
type journal paper/review (English)
date of publishing 14-05-2013
journal title Eur Neurol (70/1-2)
ISSN electronic 1421-9913
pages 35-41
PubMed 23689307
DOI 10.1159/000346761